FC2ブログ

† 文学 †

Ash-Wednesday by T.S.Eliot ー T・S・エリオット『灰の水曜日』


The Complete Poems and PlaysThe Complete Poems and Plays
(2004/10/07)
T. S. Eliot

商品詳細を見る


Ash-Wednesday

by T S Eliot



Because I do not hope to turn again
Because I do not hope
Because I do not hope to turn
Desiring this man's gift and that man's scope
I no longer strive to strive towards such things
(Why should the aged eagle stretch its wings?)
Why should I mourn
The vanished power of the usual reign?

Because I do not hope to know again
The infirm glory of the positive hour
Because I do not think
Because I know I shall not know
The one veritable transitory power
Because I cannot drink
There, where trees flower, and springs flow, for there is nothing again

Because I know that time is always time
And place is always and only place
And what is actual is actual only for one time
And only for one place
I rejoice that things are as they are and
I renounce the blessed face
And renounce the voice
Because I cannot hope to turn again
Consequently I rejoice, having to construct something
Upon which to rejoice

And pray to God to have mercy upon us
And pray that I may forget
These matters that with myself I too much discuss
Too much explain
Because I do not hope to turn again
Let these words answer
For what is done, not to be done again
May the judgement not be too heavy upon us

Because these wings are no longer wings to fly
But merely vans to beat the air
The air which is now thoroughly small and dry
Smaller and dryer than the will
Teach us to care and not to care
Teach us to sit still.

Pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death
Pray for us now and at the hour of our death.

II

Lady, three white leopards sat under a juniper-tree
In the cool of the day, having fed to satiety
On my legs my heart my liver and that which had been contained
In the hollow round of my skull. And God said
Shall these bones live? shall these
Bones live? And that which had been contained
In the bones (which were already dry) said chirping:
Because of the goodness of this Lady
And because of her loveliness, and because
She honours the Virgin in meditation,
We shine with brightness. And I who am here dissembled
Proffer my deeds to oblivion, and my love
To the posterity of the desert and the fruit of the gourd.
It is this which recovers
My guts the strings of my eyes and the indigestible portions
Which the leopards reject. The Lady is withdrawn
In a white gown, to contemplation, in a white gown.
Let the whiteness of bones atone to forgetfulness.
There is no life in them. As I am forgotten
And would be forgotten, so I would forget
Thus devoted, concentrated in purpose. And God said
Prophesy to the wind, to the wind only for only
The wind will listen. And the bones sang chirping
With the burden of the grasshopper, saying

Lady of silences
Calm and distressed
Torn and most whole
Rose of memory
Rose of forgetfulness
Exhausted and life-giving
Worried reposeful
The single Rose
Is now the Garden
Where all loves end
Terminate torment
Of love unsatisfied
The greater torment
Of love satisfied
End of the endless
Journey to no end
Conclusion of all that
Is inconclusible
Speech without word and
Word of no speech
Grace to the Mother
For the Garden
Where all love ends.

Under a juniper-tree the bones sang, scattered and shining
We are glad to be scattered, we did little good to each other,
Under a tree in the cool of the day, with the blessing of sand,
Forgetting themselves and each other, united
In the quiet of the desert. This is the land which ye
Shall divide by lot. And neither division nor unity
Matters. This is the land. We have our inheritance.

III

At the first turning of the second stair
I turned and saw below
The same shape twisted on the banister
Under the vapour in the fetid air
Struggling with the devil of the stairs who wears
The deceitul face of hope and of despair.

At the second turning of the second stair
I left them twisting, turning below;
There were no more faces and the stair was dark,
Damp, jagged, like an old man's mouth drivelling, beyond repair,
Or the toothed gullet of an aged shark.

At the first turning of the third stair
Was a slotted window bellied like the figs's fruit
And beyond the hawthorn blossom and a pasture scene
The broadbacked figure drest in blue and green
Enchanted the maytime with an antique flute.
Blown hair is sweet, brown hair over the mouth blown,
Lilac and brown hair;
Distraction, music of the flute, stops and steps of the mind over the third stair,
Fading, fading; strength beyond hope and despair
Climbing the third stair.

Lord, I am not worthy
Lord, I am not worthy
but speak the word only.

IV

Who walked between the violet and the violet
Who walked between
The various ranks of varied green
Going in white and blue, in Mary's colour,
Talking of trivial things
In ignorance and knowledge of eternal dolour
Who moved among the others as they walked,
Who then made strong the fountains and made fresh the springs

Made cool the dry rock and made firm the sand
In blue of larkspur, blue of Mary's colour,
Sovegna vos

Here are the years that walk between, bearing
Away the fiddles and the flutes, restoring
One who moves in the time between sleep and waking, wearing

White light folded, sheathing about her, folded.
The new years walk, restoring
Through a bright cloud of tears, the years, restoring
With a new verse the ancient rhyme. Redeem
The time. Redeem
The unread vision in the higher dream
While jewelled unicorns draw by the gilded hearse.

The silent sister veiled in white and blue
Between the yews, behind the garden god,
Whose flute is breathless, bent her head and signed but spoke no word

But the fountain sprang up and the bird sang down
Redeem the time, redeem the dream
The token of the word unheard, unspoken

Till the wind shake a thousand whispers from the yew

And after this our exile

V

If the lost word is lost, if the spent word is spent
If the unheard, unspoken
Word is unspoken, unheard;
Still is the unspoken word, the Word unheard,
The Word without a word, the Word within
The world and for the world;
And the light shone in darkness and
Against the Word the unstilled world still whirled
About the centre of the silent Word.

O my people, what have I done unto thee.

Where shall the word be found, where will the word
Resound? Not here, there is not enough silence
Not on the sea or on the islands, not
On the mainland, in the desert or the rain land,
For those who walk in darkness
Both in the day time and in the night time
The right time and the right place are not here
No place of grace for those who avoid the face
No time to rejoice for those who walk among noise and deny the voice

Will the veiled sister pray for
Those who walk in darkness, who chose thee and oppose thee,
Those who are torn on the horn between season and season, time and time, between
Hour and hour, word and word, power and power, those who wait
In darkness? Will the veiled sister pray
For children at the gate
Who will not go away and cannot pray:
Pray for those who chose and oppose

O my people, what have I done unto thee.

Will the veiled sister between the slender
Yew trees pray for those who offend her
And are terrified and cannot surrender
And affirm before the world and deny between the rocks
In the last desert before the last blue rocks
The desert in the garden the garden in the desert
Of drouth, spitting from the mouth the withered apple-seed.

O my people.

VI

Although I do not hope to turn again
Although I do not hope
Although I do not hope to turn

Wavering between the profit and the loss
In this brief transit where the dreams cross
The dreamcrossed twilight between birth and dying
(Bless me father) though I do not wish to wish these things
From the wide window towards the granite shore
The white sails still fly seaward, seaward flying
Unbroken wings

And the lost heart stiffens and rejoices
In the lost lilac and the lost sea voices
And the weak spirit quickens to rebel
For the bent golden-rod and the lost sea smell
Quickens to recover
The cry of quail and the whirling plover
And the blind eye creates
The empty forms between the ivory gates
And smell renews the salt savour of the sandy earth This is the time of tension between dying and birth The place of solitude where three dreams cross Between blue rocks But when the voices shaken from the yew-tree drift away Let the other yew be shaken and reply.

Blessed sister, holy mother, spirit of the fountain, spirit of the garden,
Suffer us not to mock ourselves with falsehood
Teach us to care and not to care
Teach us to sit still
Even among these rocks,
Our peace in His will
And even among these rocks
Sister, mother
And spirit of the river, spirit of the sea,
Suffer me not to be separated

And let my cry come unto Thee.






T・S・エリオット『灰の水曜日』評

この後期エリオットの『灰の水曜日』を読んだ時、私は自然と涙を流していることに気付いた。
エリオットは『荒地』を発表してから、1927年にアングロ・カトリックに改宗し、詩作において宗教的な側面を色濃く反映し始めたとされている。私がこの詩に計り知れない感動を覚え、不意に涙腺を弛緩させてしまったのは、もしかすると同じ「カトリック」としての私の共感が働いたからなのかもしれない。これを書いたエリオットは今の私よりも無論ずっと年上(エリオットは六部構成のこの詩を1930年にロンドンとニューヨークで出版している。その時の年齢は42歳で、カトリックの洗礼を受けたのはその3年前)だが、私には何故か青春を謳歌した瑞々しい詩よりも、悔いや過ちを担った熟年期の心情を綴った作風に惹かれる自分を新たに見出す。

Because I know that time is always time
And place is always and only place
And what is actual is actual only for one time
And only for one place
I rejoice that things are as they are and
I renounce the blessed face
And renounce the voice
Because I cannot hope to turn again
Consequently I rejoice, having to construct something
Upon which to rejoice


わたしは、時はいつでも時であり、場所はいつでも
場所であり、ただそれだけだと知っているから
また、現実とは、ほんの一度だけ、一つの場所においてだけ
現実であると知っているから
わたしは物ごとが今あるままにあることを喜び
あの祝福された顔をあきらめ
あの声をあきらめる
わたしは振り返ることを望むことはできぬから
だからこそわたしは歓ぶ、歓びの礎となるものを
築かねばならぬことを



この箇所はひとつひとつの言葉が、詩編に匹敵するほどの豊かさを持っている。
どの言葉も深い智慧に満ちて、我々のこれからの人生にとっての大切な「薬」の効能を秘めている気がしてならない。And what is actual is actual only for one time /And only for one place(また、現実とは、ほんの一度だけ、一つの場所においてだけ/現実であると知っているから)、この言葉に触れた時、私は人生の中で本当の自分とは何かを知ることができるのは、「たった一瞬」であるに過ぎないと述べたホルヘ・ルイス・ボルヘスの言葉を思い出していた。エリオットのこの箇所には、替え替えの無い美しい一瞬を大切にしなければならないという教訓というよりも、二度と戻ってこない「あの一瞬」への郷愁を感じているような気もして、独特な悲哀さえ漂っている。I rejoice that things are as they are and/I renounce the blessed face/And renounce the voice(わたしは物ごとが今あるままにあることを喜び/あの祝福された顔をあきらめ/あの声をあきらめる)、ここには青年期でも老年期でもない、人生の辛酸を舐めた「諦念」が感じられる。そして、I rejoice that things are as they areとは、いわば「今、この時」を素直に受け入れることーー今の自分を赦し、認め、受け入れることを意味していると考えられる。つまり、ここでエリオットは読み手と共に己を励ましているのであり、この詩には強く「薬」としての力が感じられるのである。Because I cannot hope to turn again/Consequently I rejoice, having to construct something/Upon which to rejoice(わたしは振り返ることを望むことはできぬから/だからこそわたしは歓ぶ、歓びの礎となるものを/築かねばならぬことを)、rejoiceの基盤をconstructすることーーこれが最も重要な詩人のメッセージの一つだ。コンストラクトという言葉には、建物を「建設する」とか、何かオブジェを「構成する」という意味がある。いわば広義において“造る”わけである。我々がコンストラクトせねばならないのは、rejoiceの基盤なのだ。そして、デリダ的なキータームをあえて詩的に慣用すれば、我々は「物事をありのままに見ようとしない心」をこそ、ディコンストラクト(脱構築)しなければならないのだろう。


And pray to God to have mercy upon us
And pray that I may forget
These matters that with myself I too much discuss
Too much explain
Because I do not hope to turn again
Let these words answer
For what is done, not to be done again
May the judgement not be too heavy upon us


わたしは〈神〉に祈る、われらに慈悲を垂れたまえと
また、わたしは祈る、自分の心の中でくどくどしく論じ
くどくどしく説明してきた諸々の事柄を
忘れさせたまえと
わたしは振り返ろうとは望まぬから
これらの言葉をすでになされたことの
償いたらしめ、同じことを繰り返さぬようにさせたまえと
願わくは、われらの上に裁きのあまりに重からざらむことを




Because these wings are no longer wings to fly
But merely vans to beat the air
The air which is now thoroughly small and dry
Smaller and dryer than the will
Teach us to care and not to care
Teach us to sit still.

Pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death
Pray for us now and at the hour of our death.


この翼はもはや天翔る翼ではなく
ただ空しく虚空を打つ唐箕にすぎぬから
その虚空も今では果てしなく小さく乾燥し
意志よりもっと小さく乾燥しているから
心しつつ心せざる術を教えたまえ
心静かに坐す術を教えたまえ

祈りたまえ、われら罪人のために、今も、死のときも
祈りたまえ、われらのために、今も、われらの死のときも



エリオットは典礼聖歌の形式や詩編、イザヤの預言の諸形式を慣用していると思われる。その中でも、特にTeach us to care and not to care/Teach us to sit still.(心しつつ心せざる術を教えたまえ/心静かに坐す術を教えたまえ)は特に印象的だ。「心しつつ心せざる術を教えたまえ」の部分は、「care(ケア)しつつ、careしない方法を教えたまえ」と直訳風にして考えた方が判り易いかもしれない。careには「救護、心配する」という意味があるので、「救護されつつも救護されなくても済む強い〈意志〉」を私に与えて下さい、というふうに解釈することもできるかもしれない。岩崎宗治氏の解説によると、「心しつつ心せざる術」には、「意志の放棄に心を向けることは、何ものにも心を向けないこと。現世的欲望も救済も求めない、そんな絶対的〈無〉の境地にあってひたすら祈ることを詩人は願っている」(*1)と書かれている。
また、私がこの詩全体の中でも核心になっていると感じた「心静かに坐す術を教えたまえ(Teach us to sit still)」は、リフレインになって反復されている。岩崎氏は「心静かい坐す術」について、詩編46編10節の「汝等しづまりて我の神たるを知れ」、およびプレーズ・パスカルの『パンセ』断章139の「人間の不幸というものは、みなただ一つのこと、すなわち部屋の中に静かに休んでいられないことから起こる」との相関を述べている。あるいは、十字架の聖ヨハネによると、「魂が神に向かう受動的な構え」であるという(*2)。
同じひとつの詩集の中に、これほど豊かな生きる上での深い智慧が展開されているということに、私はほとんど奇蹟的なものを見出す。この詩が、聖書の匿名的な詩編作者ではなく、エリオットという固有名詞を持った一人の詩人によって書かれたということが、「信仰」と「芸術」を共に必要とする私にとって極めて重要な意味を持っている。

Lady of silences
Calm and distressed
Torn and most whole
Rose of memory
Rose of forgetfulness
Exhausted and life-giving
Worried reposeful
The single Rose
Is now the Garden
Where all loves end
Terminate torment
Of love unsatisfied
The greater torment
Of love satisfied
End of the endless
Journey to no end
Conclusion of all that
Is inconclusible
Speech without word and
Word of no speech
Grace to the Mother
For the Garden
Where all love ends.


沈黙の〈聖女〉よ
心静かに悲しみに耐え
引き裂かれてなお無傷で
記憶の薔薇
忘却の薔薇
困憊しつつも命を与え
悩みつつも安らぎに満ち
ただ一輪の〈薔薇〉
今、〈庭〉となり
すべての愛ここに終わる
満たされぬ愛の
苦悩は終わり
満たされし愛の
さらに大いなる苦悩も
終わり定めぬ
終わりなき旅の終わり
結論の出ない
すべてのものの結論
言葉なき語らいと
語らいなき〈言葉〉
〈母〉への祈り
愛のすべてが終わる
〈庭〉を求めて



ここも形式が他とは違うので、詳しく研究者の解釈を読解しておきたい。
岩崎氏によれば、ここでいう〈聖女〉は「聖母マリア」であり、この部分は「聖処女マリアへの連祷」の変奏になっているという。マリアはベアトリーチェ的な〈薔薇〉であり、「すべての愛」と「愛の苦悩」の終わる〈庭〉であるとされる。マリアが〈薔薇〉に象徴化されている典拠は、ダンテの「天国篇」でのベアトリーチェの言葉である「神の言葉が肉と化した/薔薇の花」という句に由来している。イエスは神のロゴスの生ける受肉であるが、マリアはその「薔薇の花」だとされている。実際、絵画でも薔薇は聖母の象徴的なアトリビュートである。
愛は甘美な味を我々に教えるが、同時に苦みをも教える。そして、愛の光と影が全て吸収される聖なる空間、そこをエリオットは〈庭〉と表現している。〈庭〉も雅歌によればやはり聖母マリアの象徴である。(*3)

But the fountain sprang up and the bird sang down
Redeem the time, redeem the dream
The token of the word unheard, unspoken

Till the wind shake a thousand whispers from the yew

And after this our exile



だが、泉の水は湧き上がり、そして小鳥の声は降り注いだ
購え時間を、購え夢を
聞かれず語られぬ言葉のしるしを

風が水松の樹から千もの囁きをふるい落とすまで

そして、われらのこの流謫の後までも



Redeem the time, redeem the dream(購え時間を、購え夢を)という印象的な表現について、岩崎氏は「購え時間を」は「罪を悔い改めて過去の時間に新しい意味を与えよ」と解釈している。また、「購え夢を」とは、「低い夢」しか見ることができなくなった現代人に対して、かつてベアトリーチェをダンテが幻視したような「高い夢」を「読み解いて」、「過去の時間に意味を与えよ」というメッセージであると解釈している。(*4)


Will the veiled sister between the slender
Yew trees pray for those who offend her
And are terrified and cannot surrender
And affirm before the world and deny between the rocks
In the last desert before the last blue rocks
The desert in the garden the garden in the desert
Of drouth, spitting from the mouth the withered apple-seed.

O my people.



ほっそりした水松と水松のあいだに立つヴェールを着けた修道女は
祈ってくれるだろうかーー彼女の心を傷つけ
怖れながらも従うことができず
世間の前では肯じながら、岩と岩のあいだで否認する者たちのために
祈ってくれるだろうか、最後の青い岩と岩のあいだの最後の荒野で
庭の中の荒野、乾き切った荒野の中の庭で
萎びた林檎の種を吐き出す者たちのために

おお、わが民よ



ここで印象的なのは、In the last desert before the last blue rocks(最後の青い岩と岩のあいだの最後の荒野で)という表現だ。特に洗礼者聖ヨハネを洗礼名に持つ私の場合、こういう「荒野」にまつわる神秘的な表現には惹かれるものがある。岩崎氏によれば、「青」という色彩は「聖母マリア」の色であるという。その理由は、アルベルトゥス・マグヌスも「マリアの語源論」で述べていたように、彼女MaryはMarinaと同様、mare(海)を暗示するからだという。「最後の荒野」は、「臨終の場面」を表現していると解釈されているが、カトリックの信徒にとって「荒野」は神の子の到来を待ち望む神聖な約束の場所でもあるので、「最後の荒野」はもしかすると「最後まで諦めずに佇む祈りの最果て」というように解釈することも可能かもしれない。(*5)




訳文は岩崎宗治氏に拠る。

*1)T・S・エリオット、岩崎宗治訳『四つの四十奏』(岩波文庫)p138
*2)同書p138
*3)同書p144
*4)同書p152
*5)同書p159


関連記事
スポンサーサイト
*Edit TB(0) | CO(0)



~ Comment ~















管理者にだけ表示を許可する

~ Trackback ~


Back      Next